Tag Archives: blog

I’m video blogging now!

I have started a video blog (or Vlog) called Pollywood. I know, it’s a corny name but all I could think of.

It’s a day-in-the-life type weekly video series that my family and friends in Vancouver talked me into because they wanted to see what life was like in India and the film industry here. It’s going to be a mish-mash of whatever is happening in my life, some perspective on the film industry (my own limited perspective), and general info about India and what’s going on over here.

Just a warning, there is going to be a LOT of my cat Mogambo in every video but don’t worry, he’s cool.

I have no expectations for the series but once I put up my first video on Monday I would love feedback from anyone who is interested in seeing more.

Check it out! Pollywood Vlog

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Mogambo the cat.

Canadian Frame(lines)

If you have ever wondered what it means to be a Canadian, you aren’t the first. Whenever I have travelled around the world, I am often asked why Canadians think they’re different from Americans when we look and sound almost the same. The best answer I can produce is usually that being Canadian means I’m basically American but without all the bad characteristics foreigners assign to people from the USA. One might also say that to be Canadian is to be multi-cultural, but really that makes no sense at all. Just because I’m Canadian doesn’t mean there is any Chinese, Indian, Spanish, or African in me at all.

Many people from the above mentioned categories also define themselves as Indo-Canadian, Chinese-Canadian, or Afro-Canadian. As a caucasian and first-generation Canadian, I often have to refer to my own ‘roots’ as well but am usually only asked by other caucasian-Canadians.

Apart from our aboriginal population, Canadians have all come from somewhere else in relatively recent history. At least this is the feeling you get when you live in an urban metropolis.

However, two filmmakers from Vancouver are trying to search deeper for what being Canadian means to people living in rural areas. The project is called Canadian Frame(lines). Alexandra Caulfield and Ryder T. White spent a year refurbishing a school bus they have aptly named their “Pet”, and then took off on January 1st 2013 to start a one-year journey across the small town of Canada in search of answers.

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Their method is artistic. They are taking the old format of super 8 mm film and teaching communities across Canada how to shoot and process 8mm film while they take their cameras home and shoot what they think defines life in their community. At the end of the year, they will take their footage back to Vancouver and create a walk-through gallery installation, allowing the audience to take a walking tour across the smaller communities of Canada.

ImageThey have been thoroughly documenting their process with weekly update videos on youtube, as well as their own mini web-series of documentaries featuring interesting people they have met along the way. You can check them out on their youtube channel, and also see their blogs and videos through their website. This will culminate in the gallery installation, but they are also working on other projects.

ImageAlong this journey, they have also been finding odd jobs like shooting a music video in New York for Marcus Aurelius, an electronic music artist based out of San Diego, and creating a documentary called Coming Home, featuring people who have left Newfoundland and returned home to their community for various reasons. On top of all this, they are also writing fictional feature film scripts and experimental shorts to be executed when they return to Vancouver in 2014.

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Soon they will be starting a fundraising campaign to help them finish the last leg of their journey across Canada. I highly recommend that you follow them on facebook and twitter as well as Alex and Ryder are both social media gurus who are constantly providing a wealth of information about what is happening in the Canadian arts.

Perhaps you might even get an idea of what it means to be a Canadian.

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Canadianframelines.com      Youtube.com/canadianframelines

Facebook.com/canadianframelines         Facebook.com/caulfieldwhite

Twitter.com/cdnframelines      Twitter.com/arcaulfield      Twitter.com/ryderwhite

Safety Nets and Self-Sabotage: Contenders Magazine

Contenders Magazine has a blog called Little Losers Blog: A Journal of the Perpetually Up-and-Coming. I wrote the kickoff article of their new series called Between Then and Now.
Safety Nets and Self-Sabotage

‘Between Then and Now’ is a series of personal essays that examine the strange distance that separates our past ambitions and our present pursuits. If you’d like to contribute to the series, send your story to submissions@contendersmagazine.com.

It is similar to my first blog I ever wrote last year, What do You Want to Be When You Grow Up? but focuses more on the process of stripping away your comfort zones to find out where you want to be. Check it out!

Safety Nets and Self-Sabotage

Contenders strives to be a premier jumping off point for post-graduate, 20-something writers looking to extend their intellectual investigations into the ‘real world.’ It is a showcase of their talents, their interests, and their aspirations. In our wildest dreams, we are creating a generational idiom–at our most sensible, we’re just writing about topics we think the internet needs to consider a little more deeply. Either way, we hope you’ll come with us.

Contenders Magazine

The F-word and Female Responsibility

There was an ‘incident’ that happened to me recently which made me furious.

Have you ever heard about those stories about groping on Japanese subways? I became aware of this when I was 18 and travelling to Japan by myself for the first time. I had heard that men would often grope Japanese women on trains because the women did not make a scene out of embarrassment. The travel logs never said that western women were groped because they had a tendency to yell at the groper, causing mortal shame for the groping men.

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That was when I made up my mind to be that vocal woman. Fortunately, I never had a chance to practice my scream on the Japanese train and I soon forgot all about the risk of being groped. That is, I forgot until a ten year old Indian boy grabbed my boob four years later.

The mere shock made me stop in my tracks, speechless. I was walking with a friend in Colaba, Mumbai, and it wasn’t a crowded street. The Jr. groper had been walking next to us and asking if we would marry him. Then, he briefly cupped my breast, and we both stopped. There was a strange moment where time slowed down. He looked at me expectantly, to see the shock on my face. It was there alright. He had a big grin on his face when I snapped out of it and cuffed him on the side of the head. He took off running as I yelled after him.

I didn’t think it was a big deal. I still don’t. At least he hung around to receive the punishment he expected. It wasn’t very serious, but I’ll tell you what has prompted me to write this blog.

Just last week, while waiting for the bus in Vancouver, I felt something touch my bum. I took my earbuds out, and turned to see a man of about sixty walking past me wearing a sweatsuit and baseball cap. He had shoulder length and scraggly blond hair.
He smiled at me.
This time I didn’t hesitate.
I yelled at him, “What the fuck do you think you’re doing? You can’t just touch my butt and walk away like it’s okay!”
I caught up to him.
He picked up his pace, and didn’t meet my eyes but turned and said, “Don’t worry about it baby, I’m an international rock star”.
“It doesn’t matter who the fuck you are. You violated me.” I yelled, so that people across the street could hear.
He started to run away, and I chased after him. I caught up and tried to kick him in the butt, but missed because I was wearing high heels.

I will take this opportunity to mention to the assholes who might be reading this, that I was not wearing slutty clothes (and if I was, it wouldn’t mean that I had less right to be angry).

I continued to yell after him as he ran away. A man who saw the whole thing told me that I should file a police report.
I couldn’t be bothered with that. What was that going to do anyway? I didn’t know who he was and he looked like a generic man who hung around the Gastown pub district at night.

I was fuming and felt violated, but was happy that I had had the presence of mind to yell and chase after the guy. I was glad he got scared and ran away from me…
I wished I hadn’t missed the kick to the ass.

My bus didn’t come either.

So, pissed off and riled up I went back to the pub to wait with my friends for the next bus that would come in an hour. After my unexpected re-entrance and grand proclamation that I had just chased a groper down the street and that my bus didn’t come, my friends and I got into a discussion about female blame and responsibility.

Basically, even though we are taught that rape, groping, and verbal sexual abuse is wrong and we should fight out against it, many women I know have been raised to believe that they have some kind of responsibility for the male attention they receive. Whether this attention is wanted or unwanted, there is something ingrained into society that says that men only react to female sexuality.

For a less-extreme example than rape, take a situation where a girl finds out that a boy she has been friendly with has a crush on her. If this attention is unwanted, I know that the first question that will come up for her and her friends will be “what did I do that made him get a crush on me?”

The problem here is the belief that a woman possesses a dangerous power to seduce, and if she doesn’t control it carefully then men will end up falling for her. It’s something we call “leading him on”.

I know that whenever this has happened to me, I feel as if I can change the way I behave around men to avoid any sort of awkwardness. I immediately start to evaluate and mediate all my male relationships to ensure they stay friendly.

For the more extreme example of rape, let’s think of all the times when a woman has been accused of “deserving it” because of her past sexual history, the way she dressed, what neighbourhood and what time, or how much she had to drink. Thankfully a new dialogue has risen out of some unfortunately extreme cases that got a lot of publicity. The new idea discounts all aspects of female responsibility when a woman falls victim to sexual abuse.

For the people who are aware that women are not responsible for the abuses visited on them by men, there is a new kind of responsibility we must adopt. This is not only the responsibility to educate other women, but the need to educate men. It might be hard to tell the creepy man who is gesturing at you on the bus that it is inappropriate and makes you feel violated, but now you know that it’s not your fault you should think of the next girl or woman he will do this to.

Every time you let something slide (because maybe he’s not actually said anything, or hasn’t touched you, or you’re getting off at the next stop anyway), you’re actually sending a message that it’s okay.
My advice? Use your voice. If you’re in public, tell it to them. If you’re not in public, yell it to the world in some other way.

Also, don’t listen to people who call you a feminist like it’s a bad thing. It means you believe in your rights and will defend them.

My question for you:

Why has Feminism become a dirty word?

Edit: I  just discovered this website, iHollaback! which campaigns against street harassment. There is a space to read and share other stories about this issue.

BC-India Film and Media: New Blog!

I am now running a new blog for all things BC-India film and media related, so that those who are only interested in that don’t have to wade through my personal blog posts.

Check it out right here and subscribe!

BC-India Film and Media: Articles, reports, and events