Tag Archives: Boys

Big Boys Gone Bananas

This is an old blog I wrote in May 2012 for the DOXA Connexions program. Big Boys Gone Bananas is a documentary follow-up to the film Bananas!* detailing the legal battle the filmmaker Fredrik Gertten with Dole. The film is a Coproduction between Sweden and Canada. Read on!

The tagline for the screening at the Pacific Cinematheque: Fredrik Gertten says film is about freedom of speech and the right of the “little person” to take a bite of JUSTICE out of the big boys.

Talk after the screening with Randy Hooper, a Fair Trade activist with Discovery Organics

Big Boys Gone Bananas is the story of Fredrik Gertten and his production team in Sweden and their battle against DOLE fruit company after the release of their first documentary BANANAS!* depicting the mistreatment and abuse of Nicaraguan banana plantation workers. The fruity giant came after Gertten before the world premiere of his film at the Los Angeles Film Festival, and proactively came after the filmmaker and began to spread falsities about his filmmaking practices and his documentary subjects in the film BANANAS!* before even seeing it.

The film does not use the opportunity as a way of making Fredrik Gertten a superhero, and BANANAS!*, the victim of corporations and the media. Instead, it follows the legal processes and investigates the ways in which mainstream media and government can be controlled by corporations as a way of educating the public. The story of Gertten and BANANAS!* is to show how this seemingly impossible force can be beaten, and is shown as a source of inspiration for others hoping to achieve similar goals that involve overcoming big industry and big money through grassroots and bottom-up efforts and storytelling.

The film calls out against PR firms, news media, and even professionals that have been brought over to the “dark side” by putting their name on an opinion piece written by a PR company, paid for by a client such as DOLE.

There is a call for support for independent storytellers, such as bloggers who can have a large role in influencing public opinion like the Swedish blogger who called for a DOLE boycott.

However at the end of the film, there were some issues that I still couldn’t find solutions for within the film itself. I don’t mean to say that a film is supposed to give the answer to the problem it exposes, but these are general questions I would like to see more discussion on as the film has screened as a part of the Justice Forum.

First of all, the success of Gertten against DOLE would not have been possible without the Swedish government. The Swedish government is much more centralized that the Canadian government, and is already suspicious of American neocolonialist tactics and reacts by being very protective of it’s own economy and industries. Without the support of the Swedish government, the lawsuit would not have been dropped. Do you have any ideas on how one might fight successfully against large corporations in a country like the US and Canada, or any idea on how the fight  would have played out in North America instead of Sweden?

I asked this question to Fredrik during the Q&A after the screening. His answer was that nothing is impossible, even in Canada. He directed that we support storytellers, challenge government, and break the isolation of these storytellers created by the media (that is being influenced by the corporations). He also called for journalists to be more active in questioning their sources, and for the public to support them.

Ii found the answer to be a little vague, but of course I don’t expect him to be familiar with how difficult it is to make progress in activism in a city such as Vancouver. Perhaps I am a pessimist, but I think it would take three Fredrik Gertten’s to have a chance at making the Canadian government take a direct stand against DOLE.

Lastly, the Justice forum is sponsored by CUPE BC, a worker’s union that I myself am a member of. The film was introduced by a Union Representative (I apologize for not remembering his name) and it brought up the interesting idea of increasing collaboration between independent filmmakers and unions. From audience suggestions during the Q&A, it was clear that both are invested in rights and quality of life rather than money. Why should there not be more funding for projects such a BANANAS!* from local unions?

P.S. If you are interested in taking action against DOLE, start by buying “FAIR TRADE” bananas. Also, take a look at the 10% shift program being pushed by CUPE BC. The program takes 10% of the money you spend, and reinvests it into local businesses such as grocers and markets, giving them more buying power and ability to compete with chain supermarkets locked into contracts with corporations such as DOLE.

http://www.tenpercentshift.ca/

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Tall, Fit, and Blond.

Everything today is telling me I should write this story. From a Sunday morning girl chat in the kitchen to the front page of Reddit, popularity in school has been on the tip of my tongue. Perhaps it’s the yearly ritual of getting dressed up and finding a party to go to that has everyone reminiscing about times past. It seems like Halloween is a time capsule, and we stumble around in costumes trying to find our friends year after year.

But it’s also October, Bullying-Awareness Month, so I’m going to tell you the story of my school years, and my experience with friends and bullies as I grew up.

Elementary School

When I was in elementary school I was a free-spirited and imaginative child. For the first couple of years this was a fine way to be. I would be more than happy to run off by myself and pretend to be a unicorn, and I even had some friends who would join in. I did tend to stand out from the rest of the class due to my relaxed parents who let me dress myself. My classroom had a rule that students had to wear indoor shoes when inside, so I naturally took the opportunity to wear a pair of wooden clogs that couldn’t go outside… every day. The teacher ended up moving my desk to the carpeted part of the room so I wouldn’t make such a racket.

As you might expect children to do, the kids in my class grew up a bit more every year. However, I continued to be happy playing my imagination games and hiding in bushes for the entire lunch period. Eventually as the other kids in my class took to other interests like sports and talking on the playground, they stopped wanting to play with me and instead made fun of me when I brought my hand-made stilts to school, or threw my ball out-of-bounds and told on me when I went to go find it.

My class had 22 kids, and we all stayed in the same class group every year. The bullying became more intense every year and the teachers were not a huge help in preventing it so as a result, a few children switched into the English program or changed schools every year. My parents finally let me change schools when I was 12 after I came home crying and begging to be moved. By the time I graduated from elementary school, that class only had 4 students left.

I had seen enough movies to know that when you change schools, you reinvent yourself and do a makeover to become the cool kid you always wanted to be but knew the bullies wouldn’t let you. I started wearing my mom’s old blue and green eyeliner thick around my eyes and tried to dress like Avril Levine. At this new school, I like to think I made quite the impression dropping into the class halfway through the school year like some badass kid that got kicked out of school for being too cool. Everybody was nice at first, but then I became closer with a couple of girls who were considered less popular. I noticed that I was starting to get bullied again by certain looks I would get from the popular girls like, “Are you really hanging out with her?”

I tried to stop it by ignoring these girls but it was too late. I had been lumped in with their group. So I decided to make the most of it by being friends with them. We had an interesting relationship, because while we were friends I secretly resented them for making me uncool again after all my hard work. This would come out in the form of put-downs and I would say demeaning things when they would do or say something I thought was uncool. I wasn’t a very good friend.

However, the bullying at this school wasn’t so bad. The kids were generally nicer, and although there was definitely a popular and unpopular clique there wasn’t too much interaction between the groups. Despite this, there were three girls in particular who I thought had made it their responsibility to make sure I never became popular or got to talk to the boys I had crushes on.

These were the days of msn. Friends would add total strangers to their accounts because they were friends of friends at a different school. I had a boy on my msn account that I had never met before but was friends with some of the popular girls. We were chatting and he asked me to describe myself. I thought about how to do that and decided to stick to the facts and keep it basic. “Tall, fit, and blond,” I said. Little did I know it was not the boy on the other side of the screen, but the three mean girls. I meant my description to say that I’m taller than your average 13 year old, I’m not fat, and I have blond hair, but these girls thought I was bragging about myself. For weeks after this I would walk down the hallway and the girls would mock me and flip their hair as they pranced past me saying, “I’m tall, fit, and blond.”

While in the past I may have been hurt by their bullying, for the first time I actually knew and believed that what they were saying as they mocked me was true. So I thought, “Yea, I’m tall, fit, and blond and you are a jealous bitch.” Thus began a turning point in my life. The more the girls said it, the more I believed it and my confidence grew. I started hanging out with some of the nice and popular girls and getting close to some of the boys I liked. I was still friendly with my old friends but we no longer hung out at lunchtime. I was starting to become part of the popular crowd although I never fully felt secure with these new friends. Every day I would approach them at lunch, I was afraid they would have changed their minds about me or that the bullying girls would have told them some rumor that would make them hate me.

I tried to be cool by being bad. I made friends with some neighbors a year older than me and we would sneak alcohol from my parent’s liquor cabinet and drink it at the local community center. I even got a boyfriend a year older than me (and in high school) who kissed me on the cheek. I later learned from old friends that they thought I was “so hardcore.” That was not the image I was going for, but seemed to come along with the lifestyle of these grade 8’s who were in high school and thus were “cool.” This is how I graduated from elementary school at the age of 13, growing in confidence but looking for some piece of identity and circle of friends with whom I could be secure.

The summer of 2003

The summers were an interesting experience for me, as a child who has friends outside of school and no longer feels like they have to be on defense all day. I would go to summer camps, play outside with the boys in my neighborhood, and take summer courses. In 2003, I took a sailing course with my older sister. One of the instructors was 16 and I had a total crush on him. I went through puberty early and was almost fully grown into my height of 5″7′ by 13. By acting more mature like my sister and pretending I knew who Ozzy Osbourne was thanks to the amazing Internet, I became friends with this guy. When the course ended, we would hang out and I met his other friends. Here I was at 13, hanging out with a bunch of boys who had already been in high school for 2 years. These guys were pretty alternative and into heavy metal music, so I got into bands like Rammstein and starting wearing all black. I even tried to dye my hair pink, but my mom wouldn’t let me dye it permanently so I would by wash-out pink dye and put it in my hair every day I showered.

By the time high school came around, I was full-on wanna-be-Goth I didn’t quite understand it, but my cool, older friends were into it so I was into it.

High School

I quickly found out that Goth people were not popular in high school, so I made a change in what was probably under a month and became a “baller girl”. If you don’t know what it means, imagine a “wigger” but a girl. It was basically a gangster-inspired lifestyle that happened to include playing basketball, hence the word “Baller”. I showed up to school in a pink velour tracksuit, wore the Lugs boots that construction workers wear, and shaved a line in my eyebrow. I wore orange makeup to look tanned and had a bling P necklace that I stole from an accessory shop.

14 years old and at the height of my popularity

I found my place in a group of the most popular kids in school and fought tooth and nail to stay there. I even had a girl threaten to beat me up because I was a dating a reform-school boy that she liked. Some of the bullies from my first school ended up being my friends, and we would purposely exclude the kids who wanted to join the popular circle of people talking by cutting them out by standing directly in front of them. I was being cruel, but I saw it as “Eat or be eaten”. In private, I was very nice to everyone and honestly harbored no bad feelings toward anybody. But if one of my popular friends were making fun of someone I liked, I would join in the fun because it was more important for me to be popular than to be nice.

I continued in my “hard-core” ways despite no longer being a Goth kid. I would chug bottles of vodka with my girl friends on the weekends and kiss boys at parties. In this way, I took this way further than the popular kids. This lifestyle eventually drew me away from the popular kids at school and I found a partner in crime who could keep up with me. We would go out together in search for thrills and older boys, and instead of being a “baller” I became a bit punk or a bit alternative or a bit gangster depending on the group we were hanging out with.

After that friend left, I suddenly found myself without any close friends at school. Now I was 16, and I felt I had outgrown popularity and would have more luck finding good friends in those kids that I liked but would ignore because they weren’t popular. I found myself a great group of girls and boys and we would hang out in our special spot in the hallway every day. I made some new friends, and got one of my best friends to this day, Leanne. Through this group, I eventually went through the unavoidable growing pains of finding out who I really was when I took away all the labels I had been sticking to myself over the years.

I like what I found underneath.

When I graduated high school I finished with a clear head and a confidence in myself that was hardened and crystallized by years of fighting to prove I was good enough. While I don’t support bullying and feel very sorry for the pain I  caused others, it made me who I am today. I’m tall, fit, and blond, and proud of it.

Note: While I may have come out from the experience of bullying a stronger person, I don’t think bullying should be something kids have to deal with. I am lucky to have a good life, with great friends and a loving family, and this is probably why I managed to stick it out. Many kids and adolescents become depressed and consider suicide, so please stop bullying if you see it. Give support to those who need it and avoid taking out your insecurities and anger on other people, and others will follow your example.